I’m a 23-year old biologically female humanoid specimen with a proclivity for the written word. You may call me “sir” if you wish.

I live in Austin "Reluctantly" Texas. It's not as bad as the rest of the state. Why am I in Texas? I haven't been able to leave yet; that's about the only real reason.

I write a lot when my dayjob isn't horrible, I'm quite queer, pansexual, introverted, and overly verbose.

This is my personal blog. My Avengers fandom-specific blog, defenestration-and-more, is more popular, but unrelated to all stuff here.

Reblogged from metalhearted  298,359 notes

relahvant:

kardashiansexslave:

links-scarf:

cocaine-and-insulin:

methlaboratories:

MONKEYS in the ARCTIC?! whats next, vampires on the weekend?!

but imagine if there were dragons

you punks are all so daft

Somebody help there’s panic at the disco!

someone call the sons of mumford!

I would drive out to fetch them myself except that the only car left here is a deathcab reserved for Cutie

Reblogged from ucanhavemysoup  153,680 notes

al-the-stuff-i-like:

elsajeni:

megadelicious:

dragonlordoferebor:

xyriath:

cumber-cookie-batch:

[When Sir Patrick Stewart was asked to describe Sir Ian McKellen’s early days on the british stage]

Look at that smug face. And he’s doing a little dance!! You can see he’s victory dancing in his head xD [x]

Okay but

really though.

…oh

ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

I mean:

(Ian McKellen as Hamlet, 1971. I mean, honestly.)

McKellen and Stewart’s friendship gives me life

Reblogged from queeroticomics  22,624 notes

queeroticomics:

artbymegs:

I feel like this should be pretty self-explanatory. I’m drawing these for a zine at my college (and they have a tumblr! lips-appstate.tumblr.com!), but submissions are due today, so they’re a bit more rushed than I would have liked.

I tried to be inclusive and not-shitty. Hopefully I succeeded at that. There are more of these I’d like to draw, but like I said, time limitations :P

Lovely reminders!

Reblogged from seriouslyamerica  1,734 notes

"Working-class people care more about their friends, families and communities – they’re just ­fundamentally nicer… Feminists have long since pointed out that those on the bottom of any unequal social arrangement tend to think about, and therefore care about, those on top more than those on top think about, or care about, them. Women everywhere tend to think and know more about men’s lives than men do about women, just as black people know more about white people’s, employees about employers’, and the poor about the rich.
And humans being the empathetic creatures that they are, knowledge leads to compassion. The rich and powerful, meanwhile, can remain oblivious and uncaring, because they can afford to. Numerous psychological studies have recently confirmed this. Those born to working-class families invariably score far better at tests of gauging others’ feelings than scions of the rich, or professional classes. In a way it’s hardly surprising. After all, this is what being “powerful” is largely about: not having to pay a lot of attention to what those around one are thinking and feeling. The powerful employ others to do that for them.
And who do they employ? Mainly children of the working classes.”
— Caring too much. That’s the curse of the working classes | The Guardian | (Photo Credit: Matt Kenyon)

"Working-class people care more about their friends, families and communities – they’re just ­fundamentally nicer… Feminists have long since pointed out that those on the bottom of any unequal social arrangement tend to think about, and therefore care about, those on top more than those on top think about, or care about, them. Women everywhere tend to think and know more about men’s lives than men do about women, just as black people know more about white people’s, employees about employers’, and the poor about the rich.

And humans being the empathetic creatures that they are, knowledge leads to compassion. The rich and powerful, meanwhile, can remain oblivious and uncaring, because they can afford to. Numerous psychological studies have recently confirmed this. Those born to working-class families invariably score far better at tests of gauging others’ feelings than scions of the rich, or professional classes. In a way it’s hardly surprising. After all, this is what being “powerful” is largely about: not having to pay a lot of attention to what those around one are thinking and feeling. The powerful employ others to do that for them.

And who do they employ? Mainly children of the working classes.”

— Caring too much. That’s the curse of the working classes | The Guardian | (Photo Credit: Matt Kenyon)